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Vintage 1960s Turtle Neck S Turnbull & Asser White Cotton Shirt, vintage shirt, vintage shirt, men’s silk shirt The Original Turnbull Turtle

Vintage 1960s Turtle Neck S Turnbull & Asser White Cotton Shirt, vintage shirt, vintage shirt, men’s silk shirt The Original Turnbull Turtle

Regular price $135.00 USD
Regular price Sale price $135.00 USD
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Vintage 1960s Turtle Neck S Turnbull & Asser White Cotton Shirt, vintage shirt, vintage shirt, men’s silk shirt The Original Turnbull Turtle

In the early 1960s, Turnbull & Asser was still a very traditional shirtmaker. Its shirts - little changed since Edwardian times - were being made for a clientele largely composed of the English aristocracy. Yet, the 1960s youthquake that redefined society at large also shook the hallowed halls of Jermyn St.’s most venerable shirtmaker. It was the enthusiasm and vision of the company’s youngest employees during this period that made Turnbull & Asser one of the 1960s most esteemed sartorial trailblazers, with former WW2 fighter pilot Doug Crowe displaying a ‘riotous millefeuille’ of extravagant fabrics and designs in windows that ‘owed nothing to minimalism’.

Whilst Peter Bartindale was designing Turnbull & Asser’s famous oversized velvet bow ties, and Lou Gould re-styling Turnbull & Asser’s ladies clientele, ‘kipper’ tie creator Michael Fish was ordering silks for his constantly broadening ties that, fellow Turnbull & Asser young blood, cutter and Royal Warrant holder Paul Cuss recalled, pained then managing director Robert Clark, but which ‘sold like hot cakes’. Fish’s kaftans, later sold from his own Mayfair boutique to folk rock’s Mama Cass, were initially additions to Turnbull & Asser’s dressing gown department. And in other ways, Turnbull & Asser’s young team was introducing the company to the new spirit of the decade. Within three weeks of his arrival at Turnbull & Asser, the young Michael Fish was dining with one of the Guinness heirs, much to the anxiety of Mr Clark, who felt it wrong for Mr Fish to be ‘fraternising with the customers’.

Kenneth Williams, another of the company’s youthful dynamos who would succeed Robert Clark to the post of managing director in less than a decade, recalled ‘being castigated by one of the directors for selling a shirt and tie to a tradesman’. But times had changed.

The 1960s was an era when people mixed, regardless of their backgrounds - and the smart shopkeeper knew it.

Measurements are as follows

Chest 40”
Inside Sleeve 20” to cuff
Length 27”
Shoulders 16”

small mark in sleeve and back of collar

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